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Grid Mastery-- Awesome !!!!!!!!!!!


Guest David Robinson
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Guest David Robinson

Just want to say ---- Grid Mastery is a must for any guitarist.  I have spend 1,000s of dollars on lessons, guitar systems, etc-- and this was the easiest method for me to understand the neck-- minor, major, and modes---- that I have ever used in my guitar life.  Thank you sooo much..  

 

The rest of the stuff I tried like lead guitar light bulb and easiest way to improvise I found useless.  But maybe good for a real beginner. 

 

What other modules do others suggest are game changing. 

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There is so much with music. BTG has some foundational aspects to it. Its a "put your fiingers here and do this pattern" kind of lesson. Important of course, but by no means exhaustive about the playing of music. Discard theory even. It only cracks the surface Im finding, (everyone has their own tastes).

Don't you find it odd the rest of the world calls pentatonic pattern 5 - ONE? When I go elsewhere to learn blues that's what I find. 

And the majors done in the musician world aren't 3 notes/1 string over 5 fret spreads. Id like a $ for every time I heard someone complain about their fingers not being able to adjust to BTG's method. There's an answer.

I understand why its taught the way it is. Humans recognize simple repeatable patterns easier than (lets say) more difficult patterns. Thats it.

But when someone plays for a couple of years and finds their speed compromised or cant get to a note in time the reason is going to be you aren't breaking out of the mold BTG set. One example Id bet on is that Jonathan doesn't use those major patterns.

I have an eclectic approach to learning. Take from as many good sources as you can find.

Other courses I liked are Pentatonic Fluency.

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Hi Mr.Ok III Bite,

There is a lot in your answer and most of it I find positive. First, I found " Ultimate Grid..." a great course, it allowed me, like David Robinson mentions it, to have an understanding of the fretboard and at last, I could play along with backing tracks with lots of reference points. I agree with you that the 3 Notes Per String system has its drawbacks, but it has been a great starting point for me.

Second, everything started to go way better for me with "Pentatonic Fluency". I started sounding mor melodic using those five patterns, all over the fretboard and my confidence increased. Like you, I noticed that everybody calls the minor Pentatonic pattern "Pattern 1", but it is the same so, I got used to it. Jonathan calls Pattern 1 the major Pentatonic pattern starting with note 1 of the major scale and since the relative minor is note 5 ,then in Jonathan's system Pattern 5 starting with note 5 of the corresponding major scale becomes Pattern 5.

Finally, the other solid course to me is " Play any chord anywhere on the neck" , which is a course on triads. I have been into it for a few weeks now and still am in the process of integrating it.

Enjoy playing!

YC 🎸

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11 minutes ago, Ok Ill bite said:

There is so much with music. BTG has some foundational aspects to it. Its a "put your fiingers here and do this pattern" kind of lesson. Important of course, but by no means exhaustive about the playing of music. Discard theory even. It only cracks the surface Im finding, (everyone has their own tastes).

Don't you find it odd the rest of the world calls pentatonic pattern 5 - ONE? When I go elsewhere to learn blues that's what I find. 

And the majors done in the musician world aren't 3 notes/1 string over 5 fret spreads. Id like a $ for every time I heard someone complain about their fingers not being able to adjust to BTG's method. There's an answer.

I understand why its taught the way it is. Humans recognize simple repeatable patterns easier than (lets say) more difficult patterns. Thats it.

But when someone plays for a couple of years and finds their speed compromised or cant get to a note in time the reason is going to be you aren't breaking out of the mold BTG set. One example Id bet on is that Jonathan doesn't use those major patterns.

I have an eclectic approach to learning. Take from as many good sources as you can find.

Other courses I liked are Pentatonic Fluency.

I do not know how many years you have been playing, but there are these pesky things called octaves Octave (noun) The interval in pitch between two tones such that one tone may be regarded as duplicating at the next higher pitch the basic musical import of the other tone; the sounds producing these tones then have a frequency ratio of 2 to 1. now on the Chromatic scale you have 12 notes because of sharps and flats. I suggest if you find yourself in a rut where you can't reach a note fast enough is that you practice your dexterity by slowing down in practice that part of the music until you can comfortably reach that note and practice it faster and faster with no mistakes until you reach the desired speed.

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