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Circle Of 5th's Tab


Shaan
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Hey @Ryan Withrow @Jonathan I'm learning circle of 5ths at Musical U. I'm wondering how this relates to the electric guitar and what the tab is for the circle notes. The problem with their forum is no one is really an expert on guitar. I'm curious to know what Jonathan thinks of the circle of 5ths and any neat little trick for making this work for electric guitar. I understand from the course this is the basis of everything musically and somehow it plays an important function in ear training. I don't think I ever really covered this before but I am curious about it. Thank you all and look forward to your genius responses.

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Hi Shaan!

This may not answer all of your questions on the circle of fifth, but I found that the YouTube video by Chris Sherland called "Circle of Fifths on guitar" is very good and allows you to learn easily the sequence of notes around the circle. He uses an easy to follow fretboard pattern to do so.

For your questions about the usefulness of the Circle in music, I will leave the answer to more knowledgeable people, like Jonathan or other advanced BTG members. I will follow their answer with great interest too!

YC 🎸

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On 12/7/2021 at 3:20 PM, Shaan said:

Hey @Ryan Withrow @Jonathan I'm learning circle of 5ths at Musical U. I'm wondering how this relates to the electric guitar and what the tab is for the circle notes. The problem with their forum is no one is really an expert on guitar. I'm curious to know what Jonathan thinks of the circle of 5ths and any neat little trick for making this work for electric guitar. I understand from the course this is the basis of everything musically and somehow it plays an important function in ear training. I don't think I ever really covered this before but I am curious about it. Thank you all and look forward to your genius responses.

Speaking my language! I actually majored in Music Theory/Composition and my primary instrument was the guitar!

I will say that this is a MASSIVE topic from something so seemingly simple. One of the most effective things you can learn from the Circle of 5ths is every note that goes into each scale. In other words, as you learn the Circle of 5ths, you'll slowly learn that G Major has 1 #(sharp)... AND you'll know that it's F#, etc.! In other words, it's super helpful in understanding WHAT notes to play within specific scales and key signatures. Excellent for writing, but incredible for further advancing your improv skills!

Rock and roll!!!
Ryan

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On 12/8/2021 at 11:11 PM, Ryan Withrow said:

Speaking my language! I actually majored in Music Theory/Composition and my primary instrument was the guitar!

I will say that this is a MASSIVE topic from something so seemingly simple. One of the most effective things you can learn from the Circle of 5ths is every note that goes into each scale. In other words, as you learn the Circle of 5ths, you'll slowly learn that G Major has 1 #(sharp)... AND you'll know that it's F#, etc.! In other words, it's super helpful in understanding WHAT notes to play within specific scales and key signatures. Excellent for writing, but incredible for further advancing your improv skills!

Rock and roll!!!
Ryan

Sorry @Ryan Withrow. Just saw this now lol. Ah, that's awesome. Do you know whether Jonathan Boyd covers this or is what we learn here at BG seemingly all embedded and linked in with the circle. I'm currently learning this at Musical U but for me anything guitar related Jonathan just explains it in ways that just make sense to me. In fact I don't know why Musical U didn't just let Jonathan take over the ear training and how that relates to the guitar. I'd love to learn this more and how it relates to the guitar and eventually I guess to being able to flow and play by 'ear'.

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59 minutes ago, Shaan said:

Sorry @Ryan Withrow. Just saw this now lol. Ah, that's awesome. Do you know whether Jonathan Boyd covers this or is what we learn here at BG seemingly all embedded and linked in with the circle. I'm currently learning this at Musical U but for me anything guitar related Jonathan just explains it in ways that just make sense to me. In fact I don't know why Musical U didn't just let Jonathan take over the ear training and how that relates to the guitar. I'd love to learn this more and how it relates to the guitar and eventually I guess to being able to flow and play by 'ear'.

Ha! Well, that's an idea!

The circle of 5ths is very much a "Music Theory" tool. By that, it can be applied to any and all instruments once you nail the concept. Some people prefer not to dig into the music theory world, but for those that enjoy it and want more out it, it just takes knowing your fretboard in notes rather than frets. Once you combine your knowledge from the circle of 5ths with your knowledge of where the notes are on the guitar, the rest can fall into place!

Thanks,

Ryan

GTR-Staff-Piano-Cs.jpg

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On 12/7/2021 at 1:20 PM, Shaan said:

Hey @Ryan Withrow @Jonathan I'm learning circle of 5ths at Musical U. I'm wondering how this relates to the electric guitar and what the tab is for the circle notes. The problem with their forum is no one is really an expert on guitar. I'm curious to know what Jonathan thinks of the circle of 5ths and any neat little trick for making this work for electric guitar. I understand from the course this is the basis of everything musically and somehow it plays an important function in ear training. I don't think I ever really covered this before but I am curious about it. Thank you all and look forward to your genius responses.

Hey @Shaan,

I don't remember where I got this rotating dial tool, but the most practical thing I use it for is showing the relative minor and chords for any major key (or vice versa) so I can extend my soloing ideas playing scales I already know in different places on the fretboard (like over a G major backing track, "happy" G major diatonic or more bluesy Em pentatonic depending on the vibe you're after...or intertwine them).  Quick hack: The relative minor is always 3 frets left of the major key note.  Also useful for knowing what the I, IV, and V chords are since they are always left and right of the key note, plus knowing what the minor IIm, VIm, and IIIm chords are.  Helps with figuring out chord progressions for music you want to learn, or coming up with your own that sound good.  The rest makes my head hurt :-).

Circle of 5ths.jpg

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