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How to move the patern


Guest Rgp
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I just took the course “the easiest way to improvise“. At the end of the video Jonathan explains that the pattern can be moved anywhere around the guitar neck, However does not explain what the notes are or what key the pattern is in. My question is how do I properly move this pattern around correctly?

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Guest Low E notes

Your key is whatever fret you start on on the big old fat six string. Learn the notes on the six string and you can pick what key you want to play that pattern in.

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6 hours ago, Guest Rgp said:

I just took the course “the easiest way to improvise“. At the end of the video Jonathan explains that the pattern can be moved anywhere around the guitar neck, However does not explain what the notes are or what key the pattern is in. My question is how do I properly move this pattern around correctly?

Rgp is correct If you were playing pattern one in G major and move down 2 frets towards the nut then you would be playing in F major. Move up two frets from G major to the fifth fret and you will be playing in A major

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  • 3 months later...
On 12/20/2021 at 1:26 PM, Guest Rgp said:

I just took the course “the easiest way to improvise“. At the end of the video Jonathan explains that the pattern can be moved anywhere around the guitar neck, However does not explain what the notes are or what key the pattern is in. My question is how do I properly move this pattern around correctly?

This is a very good question Rgp.  It's true that BB King used the 5-note pattern (I call it the house pattern because it looks like an upside down house) but the key is very important in how the pattern is used.  Based on where Jonathan has positioned the pattern, in the key of A it would represent the top of box 2 of the Am pentatonic scale (minor house pattern) which is known more for Albert King's style. 

What is know as the "BB Box" (or major house pattern) would place this pattern in the key of G with the first note on the second string being the root note G.  What makes this pattern so useful is that by simply bending the higher note on the second string, you can produce a minor sound (1/2 step bend to the minor 3rd) or a major sound (whole step bend to the major 3rd).  And simply sliding the pattern back two frets puts you in the minor house pattern in the key of G.  Very neat!

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